Qurbon Hayit

by Nathan Hamm on 1/20/2005 · 3 comments

I think I’ve got the date right. It’s tomorrow. I’m sure someone will correct me if I’m wrong.

Qurbon Hayit is known in much of the rest of the Islamic world as Eid ul-Adha. IWPR has a story on celebrations in Afghanistan.

Unfortunately, I didn’t get to see the holidy up close in Uzbekistan as I didn’t live with a host family. A few of my friends got the whole deal though, including one who has a whole stack of pictures of his family’s sheep sacrifice.

And, with the wonders of the internet, one can now turn to e-Qurban, which I find absolutely fascinating.


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This post was written by...

– author of 2991 posts on 17_PersonNotFound.

Nathan is the founder and Principal Analyst for Registan, which he launched in 2003. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uzbekistan 2000-2001 and received his MA in Central Asian Studies from the University of Washington in 2007. Since 2007, he has worked full-time as an analyst, consulting with private and government clients on Central Asian affairs, specializing in how socio-cultural and political factors shape risks and opportunities and how organizations can adjust their strategic and operational plans to account for these variables. More information on Registan's services can be found here, and Nathan can be contacted via Twitter or email.

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{ 3 comments }

student January 21, 2005 at 12:30 am

Yeah, you are right Nathan, it’s tomorrow.
Happy Eid ul-Adha to all muslims!
We are celebrating this holiday tomorrow at the university(sponsored by MSA: muslim student association and ISA:international students association.)
Qurbon bayram mubarak!
peace…

Nathan January 21, 2005 at 9:18 am

What do you think of the e-Qurbon?

Mark Hamm January 21, 2005 at 8:51 pm

Our moslem exchange student mentioned this. We were out looking for a Christmas tree. He said it reminded him of going out with his father to pick out an animal to slaughter.

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