Protesters Still Occupy Supreme Court

by Nathan Hamm on 5/2/2005 · 1 comment

To follow up on Chirol’s post on the topic, RFE/RL reports that protesters are still occupying the Kyrgyz Supreme Court, demanding the resignation of everyone on the court. This puts the government in a very difficult position. It supports the demands of the protesters, seeing the judges as a biased remnant of the old regime. However, they also argue that the occupation of the building is wrong.

Jypar Jekshe, the leader of the Kyrgyzstan Democratic Movement Party, told RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service that the occupation must be regarded as an emergency situation: “[The illegal] occupation of the judiciary premises and making it difficult for [the judges] to enter is not democracy; it defeats the purpose of everything. Of course, the judiciary is corrupt. It is not reliable. It is not fair. We can’t argue with people who say it should be changed. But there are other ways to achieve the judiciary’s resignation.”

This sounds to me like a plea to let the government deal with the situation.

The chief justice already has sent a resignation letter to the President Bakiyev, but parliament failed to get a quorum and will not have another chance to decide on the issue until May 12.


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Nathan is the founder and Principal Analyst for Registan, which he launched in 2003. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uzbekistan 2000-2001 and received his MA in Central Asian Studies from the University of Washington in 2007. Since 2007, he has worked full-time as an analyst, consulting with private and government clients on Central Asian affairs, specializing in how socio-cultural and political factors shape risks and opportunities and how organizations can adjust their strategic and operational plans to account for these variables. More information on Registan's services can be found here, and Nathan can be contacted via Twitter or email.

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{ 1 comment }

Curzon May 2, 2005 at 9:45 pm

It supports the demands of the protesters, seeing the judges as a biased remnant of the old regime. However, they also argue that the occupation of the building is wrong.

Only a lawyer could come up with that kind of argument.

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