Ilichevsk/Kara-Su

by Nathan Hamm on 5/14/2005 · 6 comments

Well, here’s the answer to the Ilichevsk/Kara-Su discussion:



The AP reports:

Thousands of terrified Uzbeks waiting to flee across the border into Kyrgyzstan stormed government buildings, torched police cars and attacked border guards Saturday in a second day of violence spawned by an uprising against the iron-fisted rule of U.S.-allied President Islam Karimov.

About 6,000 Uzbek residents headed Saturday to the border with Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyz border guards were awaiting a government decision on whether to allow them in, said Gulmira Borubayeva, spokeswoman for Kyrgyzstan’s border guard service.

Saturday’s clashes erupted in the village of Korasuv, about 30 miles east of Andijan. Korasuv is directly on the Kyrgyz border, which is divided by a small river.

Uzbek police and tax offices were set on fire, and police cars were vandalized, a Kyrgyz official said on condition of anonymity. Uzbek helicopters were seen circling the town.

By the by, in addition to the Western media being unable to write “Uzbekistan” without preceding it with some form of “US ally” despite the fact that it adds a micron more than zero context to the story at hand, they seem to like the phrase “troops loyal to President Islam Karimov.” Is there another faction we haven’t heard of? This is why the local and Russian reporters are running circles over the Western wires–their reporters seem to actually get to write their own stories without having loads of prepackaged fluffl thrown in.


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– author of 2991 posts on 17_PersonNotFound.

Nathan is the founder and Principal Analyst for Registan, which he launched in 2003. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uzbekistan 2000-2001 and received his MA in Central Asian Studies from the University of Washington in 2007. Since 2007, he has worked full-time as an analyst, consulting with private and government clients on Central Asian affairs, specializing in how socio-cultural and political factors shape risks and opportunities and how organizations can adjust their strategic and operational plans to account for these variables. More information on Registan's services can be found here, and Nathan can be contacted via Twitter or email.

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{ 6 comments }

david_walther May 14, 2005 at 1:16 pm

awesome pictures.

Lyndon May 14, 2005 at 1:24 pm

Very interesting. Russian-language reports (here on rbc.ru, for one http://top.rbc.ru/index.shtml?/news/incidents/2005/05/14/14194314_bod.shtml) state that a storm of Kara-su is anticipated after dark.

Sort of like the reports that were circulating yesterday about Andijan.

Nathan May 14, 2005 at 1:24 pm

I kind of miss the electric blue colored water sometimes.

reem akkad May 14, 2005 at 2:28 pm

I am an ABC News producer and am looking for Americans in the Abijan or surrounding region to call us and let us know how they are…. if you are one please send me your phone number ASAP. My email address is reem.x.akkad@abc.com. I will call you right away. Thank you.

Mark Hamm May 15, 2005 at 7:41 pm

This request from ABC points up a big plus of blogs. After some big news story breaks I always go to the blogs to get some more in-depth reporting, reports from blog readers on the ground where ever the incident took place are most times more insightful than a reporter that flew in last night. Keep up the good work!

Schwartz May 16, 2005 at 7:53 am

[quote] By the by, in addition to the Western media being unable to write “Uzbekistan” without preceding it with some form of “US ally” despite the fact that it adds a micron more than zero context to the story at hand, they seem to like the phrase “troops loyal to President Islam Karimov.” Is there another faction we haven’t heard of? This is why the local and Russian reporters are running circles over the Western wires–their reporters seem to actually get to write their own stories without having loads of prepackaged fluffl thrown in. [/quote]

LOL! Sad but true, isn’t it? US news has become so… I dunno how to describe it. On the one hand plutocratic, on the other ideological (both Rightist and Leftist.)

I hope things turn out well in Uzbekistan.

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