Not for Export

by Nathan Hamm on 10/27/2005 · 11 comments

Though the broad term “arms” is what’s generally what’s mentioned as being covered by the EU embargo on Uzbekistan. The following quite comprehensive list of items with potential use in internal repression are also covered. –Nathan

Equipment for internal repression envisaged by Article 1 (2)

The list below does not comprise the articles that have been specially designed or modified for military use.

1. Helmets providing ballistic protection, anti-riot helmets, anti-riot shields and ballistic shields and specially designed components therefor.

2. Specially designed fingerprint equipment.

3. Power controlled searchlights.

4. Construction equipment provided with ballistic protection.

5. Hunting knives.

6. Specially designed production equipment to make shotguns.

7. Ammunition hand-loading equipment.

8. Communications intercept devices.

9. Solid-state optical detectors.

10. Image-intensifier tubes.

11. Telescopic weapon sights.

12. Smooth-bore weapons and related ammunition, other than those specially designed for military use, and specially designed components therefor; except:

  • signal pistols;
  • air- and cartridge-powered guns designed as industrial tools or humane animal stunners.

13. Simulators for training in the use of firearms and specially designed or modified components and accessories therefor.

14. Bombs and grenades, other than those specially designed for military use, and specially designed components therefor.

15. Body armour, other than those manufactured to military standards or specifications, and specially designed components therefor.

16. All-wheel-drive utility vehicles capable of off-road use that have been manufactured or fitted with ballistic protection, and profiled armour for such vehicles.

17. Water cannon and specially designed or modified components therefor.

18. Vehicles equipped with a water cannon.

19. Vehicles specially designed or modified to be electrified to repel borders and components therefor specially designed or modified for that purpose.

20. Acoustic devices represented by the manufacturer or supplier as suitable for riot-control purposes, and specially designed components therefor.

21. Leg-irons, gang-chains, shackles and electric-shock belts, specially designed for restraining human beings; except:

  • handcuffs for which the maximum overall dimension including chain does not exceed 240 mm when locked.

22. Portable devices designed or modified for the purpose of riot control or self-protection by the administration of an incapacitating substance (such as tear gas or pepper sprays), and specially designed components therefor.

23. Portable devices designed or modified for the purpose of riot control or self-protection by the administration of an electric shock (including electric-shocks batons, electric shock shields, stun guns and electric shock dart guns (tasers)) and components therefor specially designed or modified for that purpose.

24. Electronic equipment capable of detecting concealed explosives and specially designed components therefor; except:

  • TV or X-ray inspection equipment.

25. Electronic jamming equipment specially designed to prevent the detonation by radio remote control of improvised devices and specially designed components therefor.

26. Equipment and devices specially designed to initiate explosions by electrical or non-electrical means, including firing sets, detonators, igniters, boosters and detonating cord, and specially designed components therefor; except:

  • those specially designed for a specific commercial use consisting of the actuation or operation by explosive means of other equipment or devices the function of which is not the creation of explosions (e.g., car air-bag inflaters, electric-surge arresters of fire sprinkler actuators).

27. Equipment and devices designed for explosive ordnance disposal; except:

  • bomb blankets;
  • containers designed for folding objects known to be, or suspected of being improvised explosive devices.

28. Night vision and thermal imaging equipment and image intensifier tubes or solid state sensors therefor.

29. Linear cutting explosive charges.

30. Explosives and related substances as follows:

  • amatol,
  • nitrocellulose (containing more than 12,5 % nitrogen),
  • nitroglycol,
  • pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN),
  • picryl chloride,
  • tinitorphenylmethylnitramine (tetryl),
  • 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)

31. Software specially designed and technology required for all listed items.


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This post was written by...

– author of 2991 posts on 17_PersonNotFound.

Nathan is the founder and Principal Analyst for Registan, which he launched in 2003. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uzbekistan 2000-2001 and received his MA in Central Asian Studies from the University of Washington in 2007. Since 2007, he has worked full-time as an analyst, consulting with private and government clients on Central Asian affairs, specializing in how socio-cultural and political factors shape risks and opportunities and how organizations can adjust their strategic and operational plans to account for these variables. More information on Registan's services can be found here, and Nathan can be contacted via Twitter or email.

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{ 9 comments }

Brian October 27, 2005 at 6:37 pm

I’m curious to see who they put on that no-visa list. That should be interesting.

Denzil Uz October 27, 2005 at 8:51 pm

Source of information?

Nathan October 27, 2005 at 9:00 pm

Sorry, but I can’t disclose the source.

Brian October 27, 2005 at 9:04 pm

Man, that’s Stalinism. Just kidding. 🙂

Nathan October 27, 2005 at 9:06 pm

Wait… I thought that only covered eyewitness testimony!

Brian October 27, 2005 at 9:07 pm

In all seriousness, props to Nathan for getting this pretty exclusive information. And regarding the information, I’m glad that it includes non-lethal and even riot-control equipment (ie. water cannons). Fairly comprehensive, I think.

Uzbek October 28, 2005 at 8:38 am

It is encouraging but I don’t understand why they would distinguish between bombs, grenades, body armour intended for riot control and those, as they put it, specially designed for military use and specially designed components therefor.
If one would look at the pictures shot at the Andijon it would become apparent that government forces which opened fire on the people had military body armour and would use military grenades and bombs if necessary.

Ben October 30, 2005 at 5:51 am

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,1564,1732650,00.html

Check this out:

Doubts about the effectiveness of EU-sanctions:

– Uzbekistan does not need EU arms, the country inherited arms and ammunition from the Soviet Union to wage more than one war.

– There are only three incidents of EU-Uzbek military assistance:
a) 20 German shephards for combatting drug trafficking (hilarious…)
b) Ten years ago, France installed night-vision equipment on 10 Uzbek helicopters
c) Five Uzbek snipers were trained at a German military academy
That’s it, according to the article.

– Since 1992, the EU lent out $150 million to Uzbekisatn in cheap loans (that makes around $12 million a year; Chinese Eximbank recently lent Uzbekistan $300 million under very favourable terms…)

Nick November 1, 2005 at 6:37 am

It seems the EU has finally learnt from it’s past mistakes…

The problem with arms sanctions has always been the easy adaptability of training or anti-riot equipment (like the stuff Nathan lists) for military operations. For example, think of the UK-manufactured Arrow trainer-jets sold to Indonesia which human rights orgs claimed had been adapted to carry weapons payloads.

In addition to Ben’s list, I was under the impression that UK-manufactured 4x4s were used by the Uzbek security forces in Andijon – also that British advisors had trained Uzbek security forces.

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