Registan’s Turkmenistan News & Analysis Archive

Officially neutral, Turkmenistan is somewhat unique in Central Asia. While it is an active member of the international community, it goes to great pains to avoid being seen as closely aligned with any other government. Following independence, President Saparmurat Niyazov adopted the name Turkmenbashi, Leader of Turkmens, and created an elaborate cult of personality that included renaming some months and days of the week after himself and family members and the compulsory study of his spiritual and philosophical book, The Ruhnama. After Niyazov’s death in 2006, new president Gurbanguly Berdimuhammedov rolled back many elements of Turkmenbashi’s personality cult, but he has governed the country in much the same way, keeping outsiders at arm’s length from the people of Turkmenistan.

Between them, Registan’s authors have years of experience working on issues related to Turkmenistan in academia and for corporate and government organizations. Registan puts that experience to work to offer research, analysis, and training services tailored to your individual needs. For more information on how we can help you and your organization better understand Turkmenistan and Central Asia, visit our services page.

All the King’s Horses, All the King’s Men

by Myles G. Smith

Was this really Esteemed President Gurbanguly Myalikgulievich Berdymukhamedov going telpek-over-teakettle from a beloved national treasure-horse at a staged horse race in Ashgabat last week? EurasiaNet‘s scoop footage and on-scene reportage states as fact that Berdy himself was, as announced, riding the Mighty Berkarar when the horse hit a soft spot in the dirt, buckling at [...]

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Central Asia Security Workshop, March 25-26 at George Washington University

by Noah Tucker
Thumbnail image for Central Asia Security Workshop, March 25-26 at George Washington University

If you’re in the DC area, please join me and a bunch of other Registan contributors at this fantastic workshop put together by Marlene Laruelle and the Central Asia Program at GW. From the website: “NATO members are exiting from

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Post-2014 Terrorist Threat in Central Asia: Keeping it Real

by Guest
Thumbnail image for Post-2014 Terrorist Threat in Central Asia: Keeping it Real

Contributed by Nathan Barrick Is there a terrorist threat to Central Asia after the ISAF drawdown in Afghanistan in 2014? In recent publications, the warnings range from an imminent FATA-like region of militant-dominated, ungoverned space in the Ferghana Valley to the “these are not the terrorists you’re looking for” Jedi mind trick “2014 Central Asia [...]

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Central Asia in 2013: What Not to Look For

by Myles G. Smith

Change seems to come slowly to Central Asia. January is the time of year that people like us brashly predict the developments that will reshape country X and fundamentally alter the course of world events. If we worked at Stratfor, we’d even be paid to have the brass to do so. I think we’ve gotten [...]

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Central Asia Monitor 07 January 2013

by Central Asia Monitor

Hostages Taken in Uzbek-Kyrgyz Border Clash Residents of Sokh, an Uzbek enclave in Kyrgyzstan’s Batken province, attacked Kyrgyz border guards and took Kyrgyz citizens hostage in events that began on 5 January, when residents of the Sokh village Hoshyar reportedly attacked Kyrgyz border guards overseeing installation of electricity lines at a border post. The initial [...]

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Central Asia Monitor 1.25

by Central Asia Monitor

Kyrgyzgas to Press Kazakhstan on Energy Shortage… Abdymazhit Mamatisaev, Deputy Chairman of Kyrgyzgas, said on 18 December that KazTransGas, the Kazakh company supplying natural gas to Kyrgyzstan, would face legal and financial claims over the recent restriction of gas supplies that have resulted in shortages in and around Bishkek. Mamatisaev gave no further details. However, [...]

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Central Asia Monitor 1.24

by Central Asia Monitor

Uzbek Citizen Commits Suicide in Moscow Jail After SNB Threats The Russian human rights organization Memorial reported that Abdusamat Fazletdinov, a 19 year old Uzbek citizen, committed suicide in a Moscow jail after Uzbek SNB agents threatened him. Fazletdinov had been working in Kaliningrad and was arrested with four other citizens of Uzbekistan in Moscow [...]

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Central Asia Monitor 1.23

by Central Asia Monitor

Chelakh Denies Killing Fellow Soldiers at Arkankergen Outpost Appearing in court this week, Vladislav Chelakh, the border guard accused of killing his fellow servicemen at the Arkankergen border outpost, said the he did not commit any murders. He claims that unknown men in civilian clothing attacked the outpost. Chelakh said that he and another border [...]

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Central Asia Monitor 1.22

by Central Asia Monitor

Protesters Attack Mining Camp in Batken Residents of the village of Katran in Batken’s Leilek district attacked a mining camp following a rally demanding that development at the site be stopped. On November 19, villagers demanded the camp be shut down by 22 November because feared that the development of a mine would result in [...]

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Central Asia Monitor 1.20

by Central Asia Monitor

Tashkent Supports Construction of China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan Railroad On 13 November, Uzbekistan’s Deputy Minister of Foreign Economic Relations, Investments and Train Bakhtiyor Abdusamatov said that his government supports the construction of a railway linking Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and China. He said that Tashkent considers this project one of the highest priority initiatives in the SCO Development Bank’s transportation [...]

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