Registan’s Uzbekistan News & Analysis Archive

Uzbekistan borders every other Central Asian state and is the most populous country in the region. The government of Islom Karimov, who has led Uzbekistan since before independence in 1991, has a notoriously poor human rights record and a reputation for refusing to accept any international criticism. However, geography makes it important to energy and transportation infrastructure in Central Asia and a crucial partner to the United States and other members of ISAF for the campaign in Afghanistan.

Several Registan authors have lived, worked, and studied in Uzbekistan and have between them decades of experience in academia, government, and private industry dealing with topics related to Uzbekistan. We use that experience and expertise to report on, contextualize, and analyze current events in Uzbekistan. Registan puts that experience to work to offer research, analysis, and training services tailored to your individual needs. For more information on how we can help you and your organization better understand Uzbekistan and Central Asia, visit our services page.

Resisting Deportation, Seeking Refuge: The Story of Nodirbek Yusupov

by Navbahor Imamova
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This story was originally published and aired in Uzbek on Voice of America’s Uzbek Service. Even when one finds refuge in a new country, justice can be very hard to come by. Chet Kaufman, a federal public defender in Tallahassee, Florida, told VOA’s Uzbek service that he felt he had an almost impossible task when [...]

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Understanding the Implications of the Ukraine Crisis

by Nathan Barrick

I’m disturbed by the short-sightedness of media analysis of the events in Ukraine, even as they begin to explore deeper – they are trapped by their own previous reporting and I hope they feel guilty enough about it to start getting it right…not likely. I am also annoyed at the U.S. government’s public analysis and [...]

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Domestic Violence in Uzbekistan: Can It Ever Be Stopped?

by Guest
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Registan.net is happy to feature what we hope will be the first of many guest posts by Dillorom Abdulloeva at Tashabbus, a unique organization founded in 2010 by a group of young Uzbek lawyers. Their mission is to encourage and empower citizens to actively participate in the process of strengthening the rule of law in [...]

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Checking in on Eurasian Union Struggles

by Casey_Michel

In late October, while meeting with other heads involved in the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council in Minsk, Kazakhstani President Nursultan Nazarbayev turned to the topic of the forthcoming Eurasian Union. There had been hints and drops of Kazakhstani discontent with the EAU’s formulation – talk of business concerns, rumblings of ethno-based discontent. Nazarbayev decided to focus [...]

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Is Gulnara Karimova Really Worth All This Attention?

by Traveler
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  In recent days, both independent Uzbek media and foreign news outlets that cover Uzbekistan are all busy following, and reporting on, the happenings around Gulnara Karimova, eldest daughter of the President of Uzbekistan. Karimova apparently lost the favor of her father, and her unquestioned fame and authority appear to be loose and doomed to [...]

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Influence: The Bogeyman of Simplified Strategic Understanding

by Nathan Barrick

Many times I have been asked to assess whether one nation or another is “increasing influence,” usually to categorize as “good” or “bad” developing events for someone with little time or understanding of the situation. Frequently, the right answer – “It depends…” – has to be discarded due to an enforced sense of urgency that [...]

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Uzbek Extremism in Context, Part 3: “Love Your President and Be Content With Bread, or Allah Will Give you a Disease!”

by Noah Tucker
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With so much attention on what it forbids, we sometimes fail to notice the way that the Uzbekistani state selectively promotes certain Islamic practices, figures, or beliefs as a double-edged foil to both liberal narratives pushed by the West and Islamist politics promoted by groups like the IJU/IMU. By carving out a space and defining [...]

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Uzbek Extremism in Context, Part 2: The Internet, Social Media and Religious Speech

by Noah Tucker
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You may have recognized the context for the picture above before reading these lines, because the Syrian chemical attacks that killed hundreds of innocent civilians in August and nearly led the US into another war will likely be remembered as one of the defining events of the decade and are only one tragedy among so [...]

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Touring Central Asia with Xi Jinping

by Kendrick Kuo
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A new episode of the China Pivots West podcast features Alexander Cooley, Professor of Political Science at Barnard College. Cooley is a well-known Central Asia and Russia expert whose most recent book, Great Games, Local Rules, quickly became a must read for Central Asia watcher. He came on to the show to briefly discuss the [...]

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Uzbek Extremism in Context, Part 1: The Uzbek Jihad and the Problem of Religious Freedom

by Noah Tucker
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The IMU and IJU make a great deal of information about themselves easily available to the public. As organizations, they don’t hide their beliefs, their willingness to use violence to advance religio-political goals (or in some cases their clear preference for violence because they believe this will result in martyrdom) and their support for al [...]

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