Registan’s Uzbekistan News & Analysis Archive

Uzbekistan borders every other Central Asian state and is the most populous country in the region. The government of Islom Karimov, who has led Uzbekistan since before independence in 1991, has a notoriously poor human rights record and a reputation for refusing to accept any international criticism. However, geography makes it important to energy and transportation infrastructure in Central Asia and a crucial partner to the United States and other members of ISAF for the campaign in Afghanistan.

Several Registan authors have lived, worked, and studied in Uzbekistan and have between them decades of experience in academia, government, and private industry dealing with topics related to Uzbekistan. We use that experience and expertise to report on, contextualize, and analyze current events in Uzbekistan. Registan puts that experience to work to offer research, analysis, and training services tailored to your individual needs. For more information on how we can help you and your organization better understand Uzbekistan and Central Asia, visit our services page.

Uzbek Extremism in Context, Part 1: The Uzbek Jihad and the Problem of Religious Freedom

by Noah Tucker
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The IMU and IJU make a great deal of information about themselves easily available to the public. As organizations, they don’t hide their beliefs, their willingness to use violence to advance religio-political goals (or in some cases their clear preference for violence because they believe this will result in martyrdom) and their support for al [...]

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Central Asia and the Syria Crisis: Assessing the Value of Strategic Partnership with the U.S

by Nathan Barrick

With world attention justifiably focused on the potential for U.S.-led punitive strikes against Syria for President Asad’s alleged use of chemical weapons against civilians, it is worth a momentary glance to survey Central Asia’s equities in the issue.  For many world governments, including in Central Asia, the issue is less about Syrian civilians dying by [...]

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The Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan Issues a New Threat

by Noah Tucker
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The Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) issued a new official statement in the past few days titled “Today We Need Your Prayers” that aside from the group’s name never mentioned Uzbekistan. Instead, it advertised recent battles alongside the Taliban in Badakhshan (Afghanistan) and emphasized the IMU’s role in fighting against Pakistan’s central government (follow link [...]

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Who wants to come to Kyrgyzstan? Prospects for the tourism industry

by Guest
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With the main beaches and resort areas of the Soviet Union thousand of kilometers away on the shores of the Baltic and the Black Sea, Soviet authorities after the Second World War were looking for a suitable spot to relax workers living in Central Asia. Kyrgyzstan’s Issyk-Kul lake, blessed with glorious mountain views, sandy beaches [...]

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No Navalny Needed: New Restrictions for Uzbekistan’s Bloggers?

by Alisher Abdug'ofurov
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Not long ago the website Kun.uz reported that the Uzbek Agency for Press and Information (API) intends to develop a by-law for the regulation of the activities of bloggers in Uzbekistan. If this document is adopted, blogs will be equated to the media and bloggers will need to have a license. The Uzbek online publication [...]

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Rustam Inoyatov: SNB vs MVD

by Guest
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This post is the first from a new author, Alexander, a researcher currently based in the UK. It seems that free and fair elections will never take place in Uzbekistan. Earlier this year there was a disputed report that Karimov had suffered a heart attack. This has yet again triggered succession rumours. There are a [...]

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Why Central Asia Matters

by Nathan Barrick

The “Great Game” is the term commonly used to describe the competition by the great 19th Century Empires for influence and control of Central Asia, especially Afghanistan.  There are many observers who would prefer to leave the “Great Game” in the annals of 19th Century history and interpret current events in Central Asia and Afghanistan [...]

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The Three Evils of Narco-Policy in Central Asia

by Reid Standish
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On July 3, the head of the Russian Federal Drug Control Service (RSKN), Viktor Ivanov announced plans to create an anti-drug operations center through the auspices of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO). The proposed plan to fight drug trafficking in Afghanistan and Central Asia called for the establishment of national headquarters in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan [...]

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Choriev Supporters Beaten in Qarshi, fined $15,000 for Beating (UPDATE)

by Noah Tucker
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UPDATE: According to UzNews and info from the Choriev family in the US, all seven adult protestors (minor children were spared the fine) were fined 75 times the monthly minimum wage for “holding an illegal demonstration” that the demonstrators say never took place. The total fine for the group comes to some $15,500. According to [...]

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Media Freedom in Central Asia: A Retrospective Overview of Major Developments and Prospects for the Future.

by Eric Freedman

By ERIC FREEDMAN By nature I’m an optimist, but also a realist. And as all journalists should be, I’m a skeptic. Looking back at media freedom developments in Central Asia, I see glimmers of reason for optimism, at least in Kyrgyzstan. But realism rooted in history shows a dim future. And skepticism teaches me to [...]

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