Russia’s Crimean redevelopment quagmire

  While international attention is focused on eastern Ukraine, Crimea remains both a gaping wound for many Ukrainian citizens and a political nightmare for the Kyiv administration. Four months after Crimea and the city of Sevastopol were incorporated into the Russian Federation as individual subjects, the economic situation is starting to decay and Moscow’s response [...]

Uzbekistan signed a new document to end child labor: Time for real change?

Uzbekistan and the International Labor Organization (ILO) signed a program on technical cooperation for upcoming three years on April 25, 2014. Priorities of the program among others include the promotion of international labor standards and fundamental principles and rights at work, the promotion of occupational safety and health and the enhancement of social protection for [...]

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French Scholars Demand Fair Treatment for Alexander Sodiqov

This morning we received a request from a group of leading French Central Asia scholars to help publicize their message to the government of Tajikistan in support of imprisoned researcher Alexander Sodiqov. Alexander is a gifted scholar and has long been admired by everyone at Registan.net. We join thousands of other scholars and researchers to [...]

Are We Witnessing The Demise of Kazakhstan’s Multi-Vectored Foreign Policy?

by Reid Standish
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Despite the slow progression and many obstacles, it appears that the Eurasian Union (Eurasian Economic Union/ EEC) is on course to come into existence. But even with general agreement among the Customs Union’s big three (Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan), there are some unresolved issues that could plague the union’s future and alter the region’s political [...]

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Tuva Looks To Mongolia for Investment in a Post-Crimea World

by Matthew Kupfer
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There are few places as obscure as the Russian Federation’s Republic of Tuva. Nestled deep in south Siberia along the border with Mongolia, Tuva is the only region of Asian Russia where the indigenous titular nationality makes up the majority of the population. Isolated, impoverished, and underdeveloped, it is one of the least “Russian” places [...]

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Early Marriages Preferred and Prevail Among Uzbeks

by Gulnoza Saidazimova
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She looks beautiful in her young bride’s outfit. When she speaks in her Samarkand dialect about the recent wedding, her brown-green eyes sparkle and smile widens. Nafisa is 18 and newly married. There is probably nothing unusual about an Uzbek girl marrying at that age, except Nafisa lives in New York and goes to high [...]

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Central Asia after the 2014 Drawdown

by Kailash Prasad

For Washington, hedging against Islamabad’s vagaries while moving materiel out of Afghanistan has meant greater dependence on the Central Asian Republics crucial to the Northern Distribution Network (NDN) – despite the steep 17,500 USD transit cost per container. The Kabul – Khyber – Karachi route in comparison costs 7,200 USD. Using the NDN however has proved costly [...]

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World Press Freedom Day and the Consequences of a “Not Free” Press Environment

by Eric Freedman
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May 3 was World Press Freedom Day, an event marked – but not celebrated – by release of Freedom House’s annual country-by-country assessment of the state of press rights across the globe. Clearly 2013 wasn’t a stellar year. As Karin Karlekar, the Freedom House project director, said in releasing the 2014 report, “We see declines [...]

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Boston area event: Please join API on April 5 for their second annual conference at Tufts University

by Noah Tucker
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Awareness Projects International’s Second Annual Conference will be held at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy on April 5, 2014. The conference will feature speakers and discussions on the dynamics of U.S. relations with Russia, as well as the former Soviet nations that make up Central Asia, in light of recently developed security and [...]

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The Challenges of Electoral Security in Afghanistan

by Guest
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Registan.net is happy to welcome a guest post from Salima Ahmadi, an Afghan undergraduate student at the American University of Central Asia studying in the International and Comparative Politics department. By Mohammad Jawed Nazari and Salima Ahmadi Afghanistan’s presidential and provincial council elections are due to take place on April 5, 2014, with eleven presidential [...]

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Russia in a post-modern international system: searching for the “red line”

by Mathieu BOULEGUE

  After two waves of economic sanctions imposed on Russia by the European Union and the United States, Moscow was denied a G8 summit and was “excluded” by the G7 from the club of super powers. And then what? Looking for the red line Over the past 5 months, the Ukrainian and Crimean crises have [...]

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Ukraine: Divvying Up The Breadbasket Of Europe

by Peter Marzalik
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Amidst escalating U.S.-E.U. sanctions against Russia for its illegal seizure of Crimea, experts and commentators alike have speculated on the financial fallout such measures and continuing political instability will elicit for Russia, Ukraine, and the international community, particularly in the energy sectors of oil and gas. One economic dynamic that has received lesser media coverage [...]

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Kunming: China’s 9/11?

by Kendrick Kuo
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On March 1, in the Kunming train station, eight assailants with foot-long knives killed at least 29 people and injured 143 others. To discuss this event and its surrounding issues, Julia Famularo, Raffaello Pantucci, Alessandro Rippa, and Andrew Small came on China Pivots West for a roundtable. To listen online, here. To subscribe, here. Julia Famularo is [...]

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